Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama: July 2014 Archives

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I had a long visit with a good service unit manager last week that said it is sometimes confusing who is doing what around the service centers because it seems to change.   She is accurate; we have experienced a lot of change recently, so I thought I would introduce some of the new council staff and outline some contacts that have changed, hopefully this will serve as a good resource for you.

This is the year of the early arrivals, Jen Thrash's baby showed up about a month early recently, so we are scrambling to get some work done in relation to the membership plans in each area.   With that said we are welcoming some new staff in Membership.

Field Executive - Gulf Region

Allison Marlow, mother of five children (ages 2 to 11), has just relocated from South Carolina.   As a long-time Girl Scout mom and service unit leader, her service unit in Hawaii increased their membership from 125 girls to 425 girls during her time there.   She resides in Fairhope and is eager to meet and get to know you.   She can be reached at amarlow@girlscoutssa.org or 800/239-6636, ext 1402.

Field Executive - Wiregrass Region

Brandy Lydick joins our staff as field executive in the Wiregrass.  Brandy and her family live in Chancellor, and she has a daughter who is a Girl Scout in Geneva.  Brandy is working on completing her Bachelor's degree in business and has considerable experience in office management and customer service. Brandy looks forward to growing Girl Scouts in the Wiregrass.  She may be reached at blydick@girlscoutssa.org or 800/239-6636, ext 2103.

Associate Field Executive - Wiregrass Region

Launa Boynton will be working with Brandy in the Wiregrass.  Launa was a Girl Scout as a child, and has held many volunteer positions with Girl Scouts since then (beginning as an assistant leader in her 20s.)  She has lived all over the United States, and has resided with her husband and twin girls (rising 7th graders) for in Enterprise for seven years.

Money Raising Projects - questions and requests for those requests need to be sent to Melinda Stallworth.   She can be reached at extension 2802 or mstallworth@girlscoutssa.org.

Programming - Mary Anne Brutkiewicz will be retiring at the end of July, and her programming assignments will be taken up by Christina Smotherman and other staff members.  She will be returning to teaching Spanish at USA, and we wish her the best. 

Camps and Property

Joe Turner has been hired as the new Ranger at Camp Scoutshire Woods.  Joe has his own carpentry business and has been working as a contractor for 42 years. He and his wife, Cindy, have two adult children and two grandchildren.  He has taught Sunday School class for 40 years at the First Baptist Church of Citronelle. He love fishing and participates in tournaments.  He is excited about improving Camp Scoutshire Woods for our girls.

Just as a reminder, we did clear cut 69 acres at Camp Sid Edmonds and thinned some of the inner portion of the camp.   It looks dramatically different.   Each time I'm up there I'm surprised at how it changes from one week to the next.   I was pleased to see some quail while I was up there and the work was going on.   We have not noticed any significant changes in the wildlife.

The camp calendars have been opened up for camporees.   We have been discussing a couple of council wide camporees opened to anyone wanting to attend.   This worked very well the last time we tried it, in fact we had a waiting list.   Hopefully that will be put on the calendar shortly.   As a reminder, camp reservations are made at either service center but it is easier to make the Scoutshire and Sid reservations at the Mobile Service Center and the Kamp Kiwanis and Humming Hills reservations at the Montgomery Service Center.

We will continue to work to keep you abreast of changes as they occur.

 

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Each year we have a program where a cadre of girls apply and serve as press representatives for the council.   These girls, representing all age levels, are asked to comment (time permitting)) about their Girl Scout experiences prior to the media approaching us.   During fall product sales and the cookie program, we ask them to represent all the girls of GSSA to speak on their behalf.   The story is always better when a girl or Volunteer tells it.

We work with these girls and do training activities, including role-playing in front of a camera and interview skills.   We also ask them to write and blog about their Girl Scout experiences.   Being a press rep covers all types of media, so girls have an opportunity to decide if this is a potential career that interests them.

I have been around this program since I arrived.   It is a great opportunity for girls to share their experiences.  I have worked with girls who were quiet and reticent, who came to life in front of a television camera.   I've also seen some of our more boisterous girls turn shy once the camera turned on, and I've seen everything in between.  It is important for girls to find their voice, and this program is an ideal opportunity!

Meet some of the girls (and a Troop Leader) who are press reps:

Mackie and Lane, Troop 8241

Angel, Troop 8605

Erin, Troop 8309

Tori, Troop 8215

Julianna and Tamatha, 9195
Tammy Ortega, Troop 9195 Leader

Cheyenne and Aliyah, Troop 9041

Mary Virginia, Troop 9134

Gabriella, Troop 8645

Claire, Troop 9327

Kyndall and Tayler, Troop 9241

Welcome!

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You and I know the value of Girl Scouting.  We've seen first-hand the way girls evolve into leadership roles, marveled as they learn new things and watched them proudly as they make valuable contributions of time to their community.

As a Brownie mom, I love watching our sweet group of girls learn how to work together and become stronger, more independent young ladies through the Girl Scout Leadership Experience.  Sure, you and I have experienced all of this first-hand, but what about the wider community?  What do they think of when you say Girl Scouts?  You got it - cookies and camping!

Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama is working to change the way the Girl Scout program is perceived within our communities with an educational media campaign directed toward changing the way members of our community traditionally think of Girl Scouting.

We know that cookies, crafts, and camping remind many people of being a Girl Scout, but these days, Girl Scouting is so much more.  For example, did you know Girl Scout Alumnae credit Girl Scouts with preparing them to face life's challenges and opportunities with resourcefulness, ingenuity, and discipline? Research shows that, compared to women who were not Girl Scouts, Girl Scout alumnae feel more capable and competent in their adult lives, have more supportive social relationships, and feel more optimistic about their futures. How incredible is that - and who wouldn't want this for their own daughter?!

Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama (GSSA) has the reach and experience to help girls in our community navigate an increasingly complex society. We offer many educational and exciting programs, such as those involving STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) to help girls realize their full potential in a career path of this nature. This year alone, GSSA has teamed up with Auburn University, Auburn University Montgomery, and University of South Alabama to provide fun, interactive STEM activities for Girl Scouts. Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama also has a competitive robotics team.

Girl Scouts can build robots. They can become Congressional leaders. They can do anything they set their mind to, but not without the help of the community. Because when girls succeed, so does society. This is the message we're spreading across southern Alabama. Be on the lookout for digital billboards, advertisements and articles featuring Girl Scouts and help us spread the word that Girl Scouts is indeed much more than simply cookies and camping.

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I sat in my outdoor office today, listening to the sights and sounds of summer -- sounds I have come to enjoy each day.   It has been wonderful hearing the girls sing, learning complex songs with hand gestures, listening to the squealing of the girls riding the banana boat on Lake Martin, while still others hone their canoe skills.   But summer is now at the half waypoint, with school looming in the not too distant future.

As we work to edit the fall product guide and meet with our representative from the cookie baker, it is time to turn our attention to the coming school year.   We will have some challenges and changes with our fall recruitment, with staff out on maternity leave and others new to their positions.   If you hear or see opportunities where we can find adult leadership for new troops, please let us know.  You can contact the membership department at membership@girlscoutssa.org.   We work to hit the largest schools first and systematically work our way through the different areas, mostly by size and presence of troops in the past.

The best recruiters for members are the girls themselves.   We learned this at the university where I worked previously; our best recruiters were our own students.   Our best recruiters of other adults are current happy volunteers, who know from their experience they educate leaders and that passion and enthusiasm can be contagious.   If you know of someone that has an interest in Girl Scouts, please encourage him or her to contact us.   We always have girls who desire placement in troops, but we never have enough adults willing to take on the challenge of leading one.   It is heartbreaking to look at the number of girls who cannot be placed in troops each year.

We have great programs, activities and opportunities in progress for the fall.   If you have not already sent in your membership registration, get a jump start on the school year; visit our Renew Your Membership page on our website for electronic forms.

As summer starts to heat up and move toward fall, we look forward to another fun year to come.

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