Results tagged “Gold Award” from GSSA Leader Blog: The Virtual Volunteer

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This year we will be celebrating the Girl Scout Leadership Experience at the annual meeting.    The scheduling of this meeting is always a challenge.  The annual meeting is set on the same weekend each year, but the date of Easter changes.  Between Easter and the different spring breaks on school calendars across our council, we can never find the perfect weekend for everyone.  With that said, we will still celebrate what we are about: GIRLS!

GIRLS are simply amazing.   And GSSA girls are REALLY amazing.   We have a robotics team that, despite being a new group, has done well at competitions.   We have girls who go out in the woods on a regular basis and learn skills they will use for a lifetime.   We have lots of girls who sold lots of cookies this year.   Some who didn't speak up before can now confidently approach strangers with a sales pitch -- a young budding entrepreneur.

Many of our girls drop out of Girl Scouts at age 11.   And what experiences they miss by doing so!   Those girls who do continue the Girl Scout Leadership Experience become exceptional individuals.   They are skilled in many life skills.   Of those who continue, we award 90 Bronze Awards each year.   This is usually earned by troops who do great projects.   We have about 40 girls earn the Silver Award each year.   And last, but certainly not least, this past year we have seven girls who have earned the Gold Award.

We thought we would highlight the young women who have earned the Gold Award and who will be presented their award at the annual meeting at Wehle Conservation Center on March 29.

Elizabeth Schloss is from Prattville. She is finishing her freshman year at Auburn, where she plays xylophone in the band.  For her Gold Award project, Elizabeth set up tutoring sessions for Hispanic kids. She involved her Beta club at school and held sessions at a local church after Spanish mass. Elizabeth said one of the most successful aspects for her was that the parents started coming with their kids, so she ended up with adults being tutored as well as kids. Also, a principal at a local elementary school heard about her project and asked her to come and do after school tutoring at the elementary school.

Adrienne Spivey is from Montgomery, where she is a senior at Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School.  Adrienne's Gold Award project involved educating children about Alzheimer's disease. She created and produced a video to help children understand changes they may see in their elderly relatives and feel more confident interacting with them. Adrienne has these words for girls who are thinking about going for the Gold Award: "Taking on a serious Girl Scout project could seem impossible. Think about the difference you will make by doing it, though. Think about the lives you'll change. Think about how you'll be campaigning for something you not only believe in, but that you created. This project may seem overwhelming, and even be a bit challenging at times, but the outcome and the rewards are worth it all."

 

Ann Claire Carnahan is a senior at UMS-Wright in Mobile.  Ann Claire worked with staff and volunteers at Keep Mobile Beautiful to create and promote a website for their organization. Keep Mobile Beautiful is a city of Mobile department that operates as a not-for-profit environmental organization and depends heavily on volunteers. Ann Claire designed and built a website, and used social media and presentations to bring awareness to the public about the services that Keep Mobile Beautiful offers. Ann Claire offers this advice to girls interested in going for the Gold: "I would advise girls to align themselves with a community organization that already has a need you can work towards fixing. Listening to the organization's needs gave me the framework I needed to construct an airtight, meaningful project."

These young women (and all the others who have earned awards this year) are outstanding examples of why we work hard, and why we celebrate girls.

Press-Register Correspondent Christie Lovvorn has written an article about inspiring Girl Scout Sara Wilder.  You can read the full article at www.al.com.

Here are excerpts from the article:

Sarah Wilder credited the Girl Scouts of America with teaching her many of the life skills that have helped her succeed.

"I learned more in scouting than I learned in college," said Wilder who joined the organization at age 10, just 14 years after it was founded by Juliette Gordon Low. "We were living in Jasper, Ala., and they didn't have a troop there, so on Saturday my father would drive me into Birmingham to join the troop there."

They taught you how to do so many things, practical things," said Wilder. "I think one thing that has stuck with me from the Girl Scouts is that if you promise to do something, you do it. You never let a friend down. It was about character-building and I've tried to live up to it."

Wilder earned her 32 merit badges in activities from folk dancing and housekeeping to first aid and rifle shooting.

In 1931, she received the Girl Scouts' highest award, the golden eaglet, now called the gold award, an equivalent to the Boy Scouts' eagle award.

"It's remarkable to think that when the Girl Scouts first began, women were still unable to vote," said Elyzabeth Gregory Wilder. "Regardless, the Girl Scouts gave young women the skills they needed to go out and succeed in the world. My grandmother was able to go to college, earn a master's degree and work for most of her life in a male-dominated field. It's inspiring."

Read more at http://blog.al.com/pr-community-news/2011/12/post_79.html 

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I suspect most of our girls are smitten with the celebrities they see on "Entertainment Tonight," the cover of People magazine or in the theater.   This focus and attention on celebrities has grown over time.   We used to know some of what on in celebrities' lives, but now with technology and the internet, we have real-time feeds of what is going on with celebrities day and night.   But what if you did something to make your community a better place and became a ROCK STAR!  

Take our own Erin.   Erin is a quiet, bright, capable individual.   I emphasize the word QUIET.    She doesn't necessarily relish attention.   For her Gold Award, she built a helipad for her small community, Citronelle.   It is sustainable because the community embraced it and will continue to use it, long after she has graduated from college and made her way in the world.  

For this excellent project, she was nominated to be an OUTSTANDING YOUNG WOMAN OF DISTINCTION at the GSUSA National Convention in November.   One of 159 nominated, she was selected as one of 10 young women whose project made a difference.   This is a great honor, but it comes with responsibilities.   One of those is to get up and speak in front of the audience about her project.   Imagine how scary that would be, to speak to thousands of people with lights and cameras, when you are quiet and don't seek attention. 

 Another responsibility of that honor is to attend the Girl Leadership Institute of the national convention and participate in various sessions in front of lots of girls.   Erin had worked at camp, so she was more comfortable in front of girls.   But still, this is hard to have everyone listening to what you say. 

 Erin faced her demons.   She was nervous, but she got up in front of thousands and talked about her project.   Because she was a celebrity at the Girl Leadership Institute, she was mobbed by girls as she walked around; they wanted to pose for photos with her.   And last weekend, Erin served as the Grand Marshall of the Citronelle Holiday Parade.   Who knew that earning a Girl Scout Gold award came with such celebrity and trappings?!    I have watched how Erin has grown in confidence because of this.   Erin has had to muster up plenty of courage to talk in front of all these people.   She has left her community a better place because of what she has done. 

Would you like to see? Here's the video produced by GSUSA of Erin and her project:


Erin.jpgOur own Erin has been selected as one of GSUSA's National Young Women of Distinction. Erin earned her Gold Award in 2009 with her project "Life's Landing Pad" and is one of only 10 girls nationwide selected for this award. 

Read more about Erin's project on the GSUSA website http://www.girlscouts.org/convention/whats_happening/ywod.asp

Erin is a 2009 graduate of Citronelle High School, and is currently a junior at Judson College.  She will speak at the National Convention in Houston this November, where she will receive her award and a scholarship. 

Congratulations, Erin! We're so proud of you!
gold_award.jpgThe end of the school year is quickly approaching, and with it comes Girl Scout award ceremonies. Please remember that Bronze, Silver and Gold award paperwork must be turned into the council for review in order to purchase award pins.

Send planners to Jeannie Napper at the Mobile Service Center. If you have any questions, contact Jeannie or Mary Anne Brutkiewicz at 251-344-3330 (or 800-239-6636), ext. 1202. If you are interested in having representation from the council at your ceremony, please contact Jeannie or Mary Anne at least a week before the event. We love to attend ceremonies to see the culmination of the girls' hard work!
liz_brent.jpgWe recently had a Boy Scout who was working on his Eagle project for the girls of this council. Like a Girl Scout Gold Award, the Eagle project is one that consumes a great deal of time, but results in making a difference in the lives of others.   If you know of a boy interested in an Eagle project with the council please let us know.   We will try to find a project that will interest him and benefit the girls.
Gold Award

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The National Young Women of Distinction (NYWOD) is an honor conferred by GSUSA on ten Girl Scout Gold Award recipients whose final project demonstrated extraordinary leadership, had a measurable and sustainable impact, and addressed s a local challenge that related to a national and/or global issue.

 

Any Girl Scout who completed her Gold Award between July 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010, is eligible to apply. Each NYWOD will receive a $3,000 scholarship and will be prominently and nationally recognized during the National Council Session/Convention in Houston, Texas in November 2011. Each council is allowed to send three nominees. Girls must submit an application and other required information to Mary Anne Brutkiewicz at the Mobile Service Center April 1, 2011, in order to be considered. A committee will review applications and selected nominees will be notified by May 1, 2011.

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The Loucretia Hollingsworth College Scholarship is a one-time scholarship of $1,000 awarded to a graduating senior Girl Scout who will be enrolled full time at an accredited college or university. Applicants must reside in one of these counties: Baldwin, Clarke, Choctaw, Conecuh, Escambia, Mobile, Monroe and Washington. Interested seniors should send application, essay, and three references to the Mobile Service Center by March 1, 2011.

 

The Ellen Autrey Anderson Girl Scout Gold Award Scholarship is a one time $500 scholarship awarded to a graduating senior Girl Scout who will be enrolled full time at an accredited college or university. Applicants must have earned the Gold Award to qualify. Interested seniors should send application, essay, and three references to the Mobile Service Center by March 1, 2011.

We have received many questions lately about deadlines for Girl Awards, especially in view of the fact that we are still in transition to the new Journey Awards. Girls who are completing their awards under the 2006 Studio 2B standards (planners currently available on the GSSA Website) have absolute deadlines for all completed and approved paperwork:

 

Bronze- September 30 of the year the girl enters 7th grade

Silver- September 30 of the year the girl enters 10th grade

Gold -September 30 after the girl graduates from high school

 

Please note that the absolute deadline for all completed and approved paperwork for all of these awards is September 30, 2011.

 

Girls who are working on awards under the new Journey standards have absolute deadlines for all completed and approved paperwork:

 

Bronze-September 30 of the year the girl enters 6th grade

Silver - September 30 of the year the girl enters 9th grade

Gold -September 30 after the girl graduates from high school

 

More questions? Contact Mary Anne Brutkiewicz, extension 1202

Gold Award

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In order to earn a Gold Award, a girl has to interview with the Gold Award Committee twice: when she submits her proposal; and when she finishes her entire project. Interviews will be held quarterly and the following paperwork deadlines will apply:

 

September 30 -paperwork submission deadline for Fall interviews*

December 30-paperwork submission deadline for Winter interviews

March 30-paperwork submission deadline for Spring interviews**

June 30 -paperwork submission deadline for Summer interviews

 

*final deadline for proposals for high school seniors

**deadline for final reports for high school seniors

 

Please note that September 30, 2011 is the absolute deadline for all approved and completed awards under the 2006 Studio 2B Guidelines. Therefore, June 30 will be the deadline for all girls working under these guidelines. The only exception is high school seniors, who have March 30 as their final deadline.

 

Please consult the revised Gold Planner for more information.

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I am looking for at least one troop in each of the fifty states to join me in collecting books in your community to give to some kind of shelter in your area. Some places you can give the books to are, shelters, orphanages, children's shelters, women's shelters, or a place like the Red Cross.  The purpose of donating the books is to show people that you care about your community and to provide a chance to escape to another world for a little while. Comic books, novels, even magazines will take a person out of their situation and escape to a better place. Have you ever just read a book and felt so invincible or like nothing else matters? Well that is what I want to do for people all across America, but I can't do it all alone. That is why I am asking for your help.

 

If your troop can help me, please notify me.   I will provide troops with a 'getting started' checklist and additional ideas.  I will need pictures of your troop. I plan to post the pictures I receive on my project's Facebook page (Connect Across America) and will provide you with a photo release form. Also, please make a journal or diary of what you as a troop have learned through the process and struggles and leadership and how you think you as a troop have done to help the community. Include times, dates, and feelings.  

 

If you have any questions please contact me, Chelsea W. at connectacrossamerica@gmail.com.

 

If you would like to participate, please e-mail me by June 9. The second due date is for the project itself, June 23.

 

Sincerely,

 

                        Chelsea W.

If any of your older girls are interested in getting their Silver or Gold award, then you need to attend the training for leaders and advisors. This is open to all leaders and advisors of Cadette, Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts. During the training you will receive a step-by-step explanation of the tools you need to assist your girls and ensure their success. This training will also provide useful tips and pointers.

 

This will be the last training session on the 2006 Studio 2B standings; training for awards using the Journeys will begin this summer. There will be two simultaneous trainings on Tuesday, Feb. 23. One training will be at the Montgomery Service Center at 6 p.m. and the other at the Auburn Scout Hut at 6:30 p.m. If you are interested in attending please contact Mary Anne Brutkiewicz by email or by phone at ext. 1202.

Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama offers two college scholarships and a lifetime membership scholarship to deserving girls

The deadline for all scholarships is March 1.

 

Named in honor of a past Girl Scouts of the Deep South board president, the Loucretia Hollingsworth Scholarship of $1,000 is awarded each year to a graduating senior Girl Scout who will be enrolled full time at an accredited college or university.

The aim of this scholarship is to reach the girl who may or may not have outstanding academic achievements, but has the ability to develop in college and who has demonstrated a commitment to helping other people.

Selections will be based first and foremost on the applicant's contribution to society through service and her desire to continue this contribution through a career of helping others.

 

The Ellen Autrey Anderson Girl Scout Award is named in honor of a past Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of South Central Alabama, and donated by her family. This one-time scholarship of $500 is awarded annually to a graduating Senior Girl Scout who best meets the scholarship criteria. Applicants must be enrolled full time in an accredited college or university, have earned the Girl Scout Gold Award through Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama, and have a GPA of 3.0 or above on a 4.0 scale.

 

The Blanchard Hinton Lifetime Membership Scholarship is awarded yearly to a deserving Girl Scout who plans to continue to be active as an adult volunteer. An essay is required.

 

Nyoika D. from Girl Scout Troop 8389 is working on the pre-requisites for her Gold Award.  In working toward her Gold Award, Nyoika has discovered that she has an interest in breast cancer awareness.  Since October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Nyoika wanted to share her story with you to keep you and your family informed.

 

Today, not tomorrow is a good day to schedule a mammogram

 

I was given the awesome task of interviewing two breast cancer survivors.  I knew my mom's friend would  talk with me, but I had a lot of difficulty finding another individual who would openly talk with me about breast cancer.  So, I went to Google and found a lady who was willing to talk with me about breast cancer. 

 

While conducting my interviews, I found the two ladies had a lot in common.  The first lady was a cancer survivor of four years.  When the news was told to her that she had cancer, her family was in shock and scared for her health.  When she thought her life was over, her family gave her the support and help she needed.  The chemo treatments were exhausting.  Because of her breast cancer she had treatments every day, but she survived it all. 

 

The second lady was my mother's dear friend.  She was vacationing when she found a lump the size of an egg.  Upon returning home, she went to the doctor and with two biopsies was told she had less than a year to live.  "I was not afraid of dying, but I wanted to live," she said.  My mom's friend is a five year survivor, but she has to visit the doctor every six months. 

 

If you don't find it, you can't fight it, and if you don't fight it, you can't beat it!

Nuggets of information for your success by Mary Anne

 

The Gold Award is the highest honor in Girl Scouting. Less than 6% of eligible girls receive this prestigious award yearly.  In order to achieve the Gold Award, the Girl Scout completes several steps designed to help her find her issue and her voice. After she determines how she would like to impact the community, she presents a proposal to the Gold Award Committee. The Gold Award Committee consists of active Girl Scout volunteers and other community members.  The committee is responsible for:

·         determining if the proposal has merit

·         making suggestions to strengthen the proposal if necessary

·         interviewing girls after their project is completed

·         determining whether or not the girl's efforts merit a Gold Award

 

Deadlines for this year's Gold Award interviews have been set: October 24, January 16, March 27, and July 10, in Mobile and Montgomery.  Girls need to submit their proposals and final reports four weeks before the date they wish to interview to allow the committee sufficient time to review their reports.

 

Girls are strongly encouraged to complete their Gold Awards before their senior year in high school. If a girl decides to wait until her senior year to complete her  award, it is in her best interests to have her final interview no later than March 27; this will allow time to make any changes or additions the committee may deem necessary and still finish before the September 30 absolute deadline for committee-approved Gold Awards.

 

If you have any questions about the Gold Award or the process, please contact Mary Anne Brutkiewicz at ext.1202 or mbrutkiewicz@girlscoutssa.org.  

Troops and girls interested in earning girl awards this year will need to contact Mary Anne Brutkiewicz (extension 1202) and notify her of your intent to begin. On-line training for Girl Scout Silver and Gold awards will be ready soon. New requirements using Journeys have been released by GSUSA and will be implemented this Fall. If you have questions about which award plan is best for you, please contact Mary Anne, and she'll be happy to put you on the road to the Gold (or Silver, or Bronze).

As the end of the Girl Scout year approaches, many troops and service units are having awards banquets and receptions and girls are receiving Gold, Silver and Bronze Girl Scout Awards at special ceremonies.  We have had many thoughtful requests for council staff to attend these special events, and we are happy to do so.  However, we ask that, due to the volume of events, you send your invitation to us no later than two weeks in advance.  We want to attend as many of these special events as possible and this will allow us to do so.  We look forward to sharing in the celebration of your girls' many accomplishments with you and their families!

Spring and the closing of the school year is a very busy time for everybody, including the Girl Scouts.  Many girls are in the process of finishing awards and want to be recognized for their hard work and dedication to making their community a better place.  Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama is very proud of all of these young ladies and want to see them complete their awards successfully within the required time frame.  Please keep the following deadlines in mind:

·         Bronze Awards must be completed and all paperwork submitted to the council before September 30 of the girl's 7th grade year

·         Silver awards must be completed and approved by the council before September 30 of the 10th grade year

·         Gold Awards must be completed and approved by the council before September 30 of the calendar year the girl graduates or turns 18.

 

Although we do not approve Bronze Awards, girls are required to submit them to the council.  Please make sure that the girls fill out their planners completely in their own words.

 

Please keep in mind that Silver awards must be approved by the council before awarding them.  Gold awards must be approved by a committee and the council before planning the awards ceremony.  The council asks that paperwork on these awards be submitted two months ahead of the awards ceremony. This is to leave ample time in case the girl has to revise or make additions to her project.  Should this present a problem, please contact Mary Anne Brutkiewicz for advice at 800-239-6636, ext: 1202.

The Corinne Jeannine Schillings Foundation is dedicated to preserving the memory of Corinne Schillings, a 26- year-old woman who lost her life in the Baltimore Water Taxi accident on March 6, 2004. Corinne was a Silver Award Girl Scout and a 1999 graduate of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Corinne received her undergraduate degree in foreign languages, majoring in Italian; she also studied Spanish, French, and Portuguese. She spent two semesters studying in Italy, first in Florence and then Milan. During her study abroad in Florence, Corinne met her future fiancé, Andrew Roccella, who also died in the accident. Corinne believed strongly in higher education for women and in learning about various cultures through language. The foundation will award scholarships and grants to deserving young women who reflect Corinne's aspirations, values, and enthusiasm for life.

 

Scholarship: The foundation will award scholarships to deserving young women who have earned the Girl Scout Gold or Silver Award and who plan to or are currently pursuing a college major or minor in foreign language. This scholarship is renewable.

 

Grant: The foundation will provide airfare for a Silver or Gold Award Girl Scout who plans to study abroad, regardless of her major/minor. It is not necessary to be a scholarship recipient to apply for this one-time grant; nor are scholarship recipients excluded from applying. This grant is not renewable.

 

Application Deadline: May 15

For further information about Corinne, the foundation, or to obtain the downloadable scholarship and grant applications, visit the foundation's Web site at: http://www.cjsfoundation.org or contact by email at: dschillings@cjsfoundation.org or by phone at: 708-957-3684 or 630-886-0507.

Join us for the Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama Annual Meeting.  The meeting will be on Saturday, April 4, 2009, at Whitfield United Methodist Church, 2673 Fisk Road, Montgomery.  Registration will begin at 10 a.m., and the meeting should conclude by 2 p.m.  The cost to attend the meeting is $15, and lunch will be included.  In addition to the business meeting, there will be time set aside for volunteer forums, so that you can connect with other volunteers to discuss important topics relating to Girl Scouting. 

There will also be a Girl Scout Silver and Gold Award workshop held separately from the annual meeting.  The workshop will be from 1 - 2 p.m.  If girls are registered for the annual meeting, it's included in the price.  To attend only the workshop the fee is $2 for materials.   

To register for the annual meeting or the girl award workshop, send the Event Registration form to the Montgomery Service Center or ndavis@girlscoutssa.org by March 27.

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