Results tagged “Girl Scout Week” from GSSA Leader Blog: The Virtual Volunteer

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This is the week to celebrate being a Girl Scout. I hope you have some fun things in mind this week to commemorate the founding of Girl Scouts.

It is always interesting to look back in time and determine what it is we are celebrating and why.   As we look at the origins of Girl Scout Week, we see that each day had a theme with assignments or activities that relate to that specific theme of each day.

Girl Scout Sunday and Girl Scout Sabbath (Saturday) is designated as a time for girls to attend services in their house of worship.   They are to take part in a religious service and wear your uniform.   Another activity is to say or sing grace at a meal.

Girl Scout Monday is designated as Homemaking Day.   On this day, a Girl Scout helps do the chores around your house.  She should also be extra nice to siblings and do a good deed for them.

Tuesday is Citizenship Day.   On that day, the Girl Scout should take part in a flag ceremony and do a service or a take action project in their community.

Wednesday is Health and Safety Day.   On this day, you should do at least 20 minutes of exercise.    You could check to see if the smoke detectors and fire extinguishers are working properly.   You should eat only healthy snacks today.

Thursday is International Friendship day.   You can learn about a country you would like to visit and cook/prepare something from that country, or you can learn about girls from others countries who belong to WAGGGS.

Friday is Arts and Crafts day.   You could make a scrapbook for your family, or make a craft from a recycled material.

Saturday is Outdoors Day.   You could take a scavenger hunt and find something in nature that begins with each letter of the alphabet.   You could play games outside with your family or troop.

We know many of you have some great Girl Scout activities planned for this weekend.   GSSA also has some fun things planned for you also, so celebrate being a Girl Scout!

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The first Girl Scout meeting in the United States was on March 12, 1912. To recognize this special event in Girl Scout history, the week including March 12 is known as Girl Scout week. The Saturday and Sunday of this week are known as Girl Scout Sabbath and Girl Scout Sunday. This week is an opportunity for girls to make a special effort to celebrate Girl Scouts.

Your troop can recognize scouting by asking your religious organization to place the Girl Scout bulletin insert on Girl Scout Sunday or Sabbath. This year Girl Scout Sunday is March 11 and Girl Scout Sabbath is March 17. The inserts are free, but supplies are limited, so put your order in quickly to ensure you have enough for your organization.

This year's insert (pictured right) features images by Troops at Thomas James and Oaklawn Housing Facilities in Mobile. The back of the insert has the Girl Scout Promise and Law, and GSSA contact information.

Order forms can be e-mailed to communications@girlscoutssa.org, faxed or mailed to either service center. The inserts can be put in service unit boxes for the service unit meetings in March or they can be picked up at the council.

2010_Bulletin_Insert.jpgThe first Girl Scout meeting in the United States was on March 12, 1912. To recognize this special event in Girl Scout history, the week including March 12 is known as Girl Scout week. The Saturday and Sunday of this week are known as Girl Scout Sabbath and Girl Scout Sunday. This week is an opportunity for girls to make a special effort to celebrate Girl Scouts.

 

Your troop can recognize scouting by asking your religious organization to place the Girl Scout bulletin insert on Girl Scout Sunday or Sabbath. This year Girl Scout Sunday is March 6 and Girl Scout Sabbath is March 12. The inserts are free, but supplies are limited, so put your order in quickly to ensure you have enough for your organization. 

 

Last year's insert (pictured) was designed by Cadette Girl Scout Abbie R. of Troop 8184.  The back of the insert will have the Girl Scout Promise and Law, and GSSA contact information.

 

Order forms can be e-mailed to programintern@girlscoutssa.org, faxed or mailed to either service center. Please order as many bulletins as there are people in your congregation.  The inserts can be put in service unit boxes for the service unit meetings in March or they can be picked up at the council.

GSUSA just let us know that in celebration of Girl Scout Week, the CBS Early Show will air a Girl Scout segment tomorrow morning (Thursday, March 11, 2010) beginning at 7:30 a.m. (We believe this is Eastern Standard Time, but haven't been able to confirm yet.) At about 8:30 a.m., one of the hosts will conduct an interview with Laurel Richie, Chief Marketing Officer, about new things going on in Girl Scouting.   Laurel Richie is the special guest speaker at our annual meeting, March 27!

 

Girl Scouts from at least five Tri-State area councils will fill the CBS plaza; and former Girl Scout Gold Award earner Chelsea Masterson--along with current Girl Scout Troop Leader from Girl Scouts of Jersey Shore (see Troop Web site: www.orgsites.com) is expected to chat alongside Laurel about the benefits of Girl Scouting.

 

Happy Girl Scout Week!  


March 12, 2010 commemorates the 98th  birthday of Girl Scouting.  It was that day in 1912 when Juliette Gordon Low formed the first Girl Scout troop of 18 girls. For years, Girl Scouts around the globe have been serving others.  During this week, some honor Girl Scouting by indulging in their favorite cookies, while others are inspired by the classic trefoil and its historical background.  

 

HGTV's blog takes a look at how the trefoil has been used in architecture throughout history.  SunTrust tower in Tampa, Fla. lit up its tower with a green light for Girl Scout week.

 

Wherever you are and whatever you do this Girl Scout week, be sure to show your appreciation!

Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama joins Girl Scouts around the country to make the world a better place as we celebrate Girl Scout Week and the 98th anniversary of Girl Scouts from March 7-13. More than 3 million girls in the United States and more than 9,000 girls in southern Alabama are discovering their path to leadership through Girl Scouts.

Self-discovery and community service were core values that Girl Scouts founder Juliette Gordon Low sought to instill in girls from the earliest days. When the organization was founded in 1912, many girls' paths in life were limited and Low's vision was to establish an organization where any American girl could expand her personal horizon by having fun while exploring new interests and contributing to society. Low was determined to help expand opportunities and learning for the average American girl, and founded Girl Scouts on March 12, 1912.

2010_Bulletin_Insert.jpgThe first Girl Scout meeting in the United States was on March 12, 1912. To recognize this special event in Girl Scout history, the week including March 12 is known as Girl Scout week. The Saturday and Sunday of this week are known as Girl Scout Sabbath and Girl Scout Sunday. This week is an opportunity for girls to make a special effort to celebrate Girl Scouts.

 

Your troop can recognize scouting by asking your religious organization to place the Girl Scout bulletin insert on Girl Scout Sunday or Sabbath. This year Girl Scout Sunday is March 7 and Girl Scout Sabbath is March 13. The inserts are free, but supplies are limited, so put your order in quickly to ensure you have enough for your organization. 

 

This year's insert (pictured right) was designed by Cadette Girl Scout Abbie R. of Troop 8184.  The back of the insert has the Girl Scout Promise and Law, and GSSA contact information.

 

Order forms can be e-mailed to communications@girlscoutssa.org, faxed or mailed to either service center. The inserts can be put in service unit boxes for the service unit meetings in March or they can be picked up at the council.

 

Bulletin_Insert2009.jpgThe deadline is right around the corner for the Girl Scout Week Bulletin Design Contest, and we haven't received any entries yet!  This contest provides a great opportunity to use your creativity, and any individual member, group or troop can enter.  Last year's winning drawing by Troop 9161, pictured right, could help spark your creativity.

 

The bulletin insert will be given to troops that want to use them during Girl Scout Week activities. (i.e. inserts could be placed in church bulletins the Sunday of Girl Scout week.) Entries will be accepted through January 15. The winner will be notified by January 31, 2010.

 

NEW this year: The winner's name and/or troop number will be included on the back of the drawing.


Click here for more information, and the contest entry form.

 

Mail Registration to: Mobile Service Center 3483 Springhill Avenue, Mobile 36608
Contact: Molly Smart, extension 1402

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One of the ways we celebrate Girl Scout Week (March 8-14 this year) is to offer our appreciation to the many of you in our communities who've given your time, talent and financial donations so that we may continue with the Girl Scout legacy of service to others. 

During this special week, we hope your religious organization chooses to celebrate Girl Scout Week by including this year's bulletin insert during Girl Scout Week. We have inserts for bulletins (5.5 by 8.5 inches) that are free of charge.  We have several thousand and will give them out until they are gone.  Ask your church or synagogue to place these inserts in their bulletins during Girl Scout Week, and let us know how many you need by filling out this form.  Don't hesitate if you need 500 or more inserts! 

Every year, a local Girl Scout designs the artwork for the insert.  The back of the insert has the Girl Scout promise, the Girl Scout law, and the address and web site of the council.  Click here to see the full size 2009 insert.

Some religious organizations also choose to let the Girl Scout troops attend services in uniform and take part in the service by taking up the offering or presenting the colors.  Make it a special day and help continue to make Girl Scouting relevant for the next 97 years and beyond!


bulletin.jpgMarch 12 is the birthday of Girl Scouting! This is the day the first Girl Scout meeting was held in the United States in 1912. The first troop consisted of Juliette Low, two other adults and 18 girls.
Juliette's niece, Daisy Gordon, was the first girl registered in America. The week containing Girl Scout birthday is known as Girl Scout Week. The Saturday and Sunday of the week that includes March 12 are designated as Girl Scout Sabbath and Girl Scout Sunday. During this week, troops should make a special effort to celebrate Girl Scouting.

This year, your troop can recognize Girl Scout Week by asking your religious organization to place the Girl Scout bulletin insert, designed by Brownie Girl Scout Troop 9161 of Deatsville, on Girl Scout Sunday or Sabbath.  Girl Scout Sunday is March 8, 2009 and Girl Scout Sabbath is March 14, 2009.  The inserts are free, however they are limited, so make sure to put your order in quickly!  Orders can be e-mailed to communications@girlscoutssa.org, faxed or mailed to either service center.  Download the entry form at www.girlscoutssa.org/forms/Communications/Bulletin_Insert_Form.pdf.

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